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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (2nd 100 Pages)

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (2nd 100 Pages)

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (2nd 100 Pages)Attractivity (?), n. The quality or degree of attractive power. Attractor (?),...
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Author: Webster, Noah,1758-1843
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Language: English
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Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (2nd 100 Pages)

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (2nd 100 Pages)

$509.07 $4.65

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (2nd 100 Pages)

$509.07 $4.65
Author: Webster, Noah,1758-1843
Format: eBook
Language: English

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary (2nd 100 Pages)

Attractivity (?), n. The quality or degree of attractive power. Attractor (?), n. One who, or that which, attracts. Sir T. Browne. Attrahent (?), a. [L. attrahens, p. pr. of attrahere. See Attract, v. t.] Attracting; drawing; attractive. Attrahent, n. 1. That which attracts, as a magnet. The motion of the steel to its attrahent. Glanvill. 2. (Med.) A substance which, by irritating the surface, excites action in the part to which it is applied, as a blister, an epispastic, a sinapism. Attrap (?), v. t. [F. attraper to catch; (L. ad + trappe trap. See Trap (for taking game).] To entrap; to insnare. [Obs.] Grafton. Attrap , v. t. [Pref. ad + trap to adorn.] To adorn with trapping; to array. [Obs.] Shall your horse be attrapped . . . more richly? Holland. Attrectation (?), n. [L. attrectatio; ad + tractare to handle.] Frequent handling or touching. [Obs.] Jer. Taylor. Attributable (?), a. Capable of being attributed; ascribable; imputable. Errors . . . attributable to carelessness. J.D. Hooker. Attribute (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Attributed; p. pr. & vb. n. Attributing.] [L. attributus, p. p. of attribuere; ad + tribuere to bestow. See Tribute.] To ascribe; to consider (something) as due or appropriate (to); to refer, as an effect to a cause; to impute; to assign; to consider as belonging (to). We attribute nothing to God that hath any repugnancy or contradiction in it. Abp. Tillotson. The merit of service is seldom attributed to the true and exact performer. Shak. Syn. See Ascribe. Attribute (?), n. [L. attributum.] 1. That which is attributed; a quality which is considered as belonging to, or inherent in, a person or thing; an essential or necessary property or characteristic. But mercy is above this sceptered away; . . . It is an attribute to God himself. Shak. 2. Reputation. [Poetic] Shak. 3. (Paint. & Sculp.) A conventional symbol of office, character, or identity, added to any particular figure; as, a club is the attribute of Hercules. 4. (Gram.) Quality, etc., denoted by an attributive; an attributive adjunct or adjective. Attribution (?), n. [L. attributio: cf. F. attribution.] 1. The act of attributing or ascribing, as a quality, character, or function, to a thing or person, an effect to a cause. 2. That which is ascribed or attributed. Attributive (?), a. [Cf. F. attributif.] Attributing; pertaining to, expressing, or assigning an attribute; of the nature of an attribute. Attributive, n, (Gram.) A word that denotes an attribute; esp. a modifying word joined to a noun; an adjective or adjective phrase. Attributively, adv. In an attributive manner. Attrite (?), a. [L. attritus, p. p. of atterere; ad + terere to rub. See Trite.] 1. Rubbed; worn by friction. Milton. 2. (Theol.) Repentant from fear of punishment; having attrition of grief for sin; opposed to contrite. Attrition (?), n. [L. attritio: cf. F. attrition.] 1. The act of rubbing together; friction; the act of wearing by friction, or by rubbing substances together; abrasion. Effected by attrition of the inward stomach. Arbuthnot. 2. The state of being worn. Johnson. 3. (Theol.) Grief for sin arising only from fear of punishment or feelings of shame. See Contrition. Wallis. Attry (?), a. [See Atter.] Poisonous; malignant; malicious. [Obs.] Chaucer. Attune (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Attuned (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Attuning.] [Pref. ad + tune.] 1. To tune or put in tune; to make melodious; to adjust, as one sound or musical instrument to another; as, to attune the voice to a harp. 2. To arrange fitly; to make accordant. Wake to energy each social aim, Attuned spontaneous to the will of Jove. Beattie. Atwain (?), adv. [OE. atwaine, atwinne; pref. a + twain.] In twain; asunder. [Obs. or Poetic] Cuts atwain the knots. Tennyson. Atween (?), adv. or prep. [See Atwain, and cf. Between.] Between. [Archaic] Spenser. Tennyson. Atwirl (?), a. & adv. [Pref. a + twist.] Twisted; distorted; awry. [R.] Halliwell. Atwite (?), v. t. [OE. attwyten, AS. twtan. See Twit.] To speak reproachfully of; to twit; to upbraid. [Obs.] Atwixt (?), adv. Betwixt. [Obs.] Spenser. Atwo (?), adv. [Pref. a + two.] In two; in twain; asunder. [Obs.] Chaucer. Atypic (?), Atypical,} a. [Pref. a not + typic, typical.] That has no type; devoid of typical character; irregular; unlike the type. Aubade (?), n. [F., fr. aube the dawn, fr. L. albus white.] An open air concert in the morning, as distinguished from an evening serenade; also, a pianoforte composition suggestive of morning. Grove. The crowing cock . . . Sang his aubade with lusty voice and clear. Longfellow. Aubaine (?), n. [F., fr. aubain an alien, fr. L. alibi elsewhere.] Succession to the goods of a stranger not naturalized. Littr. Droit d'aubaine (?), the right, formerly possessed by the king of France, to all the personal property of which an alien died possessed. It was abolished in 1819. Bouvier. Aube (?), n. [See Ale.] An alb. [Obs.] Fuller. Auberge (?), n. [F.] An inn. Beau. & Fl. Aubin (?), n. [F.] A broken gait of a horse, between an amble and a gallop; commonly called a Canterbury gallop. Auburn (?), a. [OE. auburne blonde, OF. alborne, auborne, fr. LL. alburnus whitish, fr. L. albus white. Cf. Alburn.] 1. Flaxencolored. [Obs.] Florio. 2. Reddish brown. His auburn locks on either shoulder flowed. Dryden. Auchenium (?), n. [NL., fr. Gr. ?, fr. ? the neck.] (Zol.) The part of the neck nearest the back. Auctary (?), n. [L. auctarium.] That which is superadded; augmentation. [Obs.] Baxter. Auction (?), n. [L. auctio an increasing, a public sale, where the price was called out, and the article to be sold was adjudged to the last increaser of the price, or the highest bidder, fr. L. augere, auctum, to increase. See Augment.] 1. A public sale of property to the highest bidder, esp. by a person licensed and authorized for the purpose; a vendue. 2. The things sold by auction or put up to auction. Ask you why Phryne the whole auction buys ? Pope. In the United States, the more prevalent expression has been sales at auction, that is, by an increase of bids (Lat. auctione). This latter form is preferable. Dutch auction, the public offer of property at a price beyond its value, then gradually lowering the price, till some one accepts it as purchaser. P. Cyc. Auction, v. t. To sell by auction. Auctionary (?), a. [L. auctionarius.] Of or pertaining to an auction or an auctioneer. [R.] With auctionary hammer in thy hand. Dryden. Auctioneer (?), n. A person who sells by auction; a person whose business it is to dispose of goods or lands by public sale to the highest or best bidder. Auctioneer, v. t. To sell by auction; to auction. Estates . . . advertised and auctioneered away. Cowper. Aucupation (?), n. [L. aucupatio, fr. auceps, contr. for aviceps; avis bird + capere to take.] Birdcatching; fowling. [Obs.] Blount. Audacious (?), a. [F. audacieux, as if fr. LL. audaciosus (not found), fr. L. audacia audacity, fr. audax, acis, bold, fr. audere to dare.] 1. Daring; spirited; adventurous. As in a cloudy chair, ascending rides Audacious. Milton. 2. Contemning the restraints of law, religion, or decorum; bold in wickedness; presumptuous; impudent; insolent. Audacious traitor. Shak. ......Buy Now (To Read More)

Product details

Ebook Number: 248
Author: Webster, Noah
Release Date: Apr 1, 1995
Format: eBook
Language: English

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